Research interests:

I am a Postdoctoral Research Fellow whose interest is focused on two cryospheric research topics of scientific and public relevance in the age of climate change: the accelerated retreat of marine-terminating glaciers, and the generation and deterioration of marine ice hazards (e.g., icebergs). I am well versed in modelling and field research, and have a specific interest in the development of technology for monitoring remote or difficult to access ice features (i.e., glaciers, ice shelves, and icebergs). My current 3D modelling investigations of future glacier retreat complement my background in field-based iceberg studies. I appreciate research that is directly relevant to the welfare of society, and I explore connections between climate change, glacial ice hazard production and Arctic offshore activity. My work has shown strong application to societal concerns though funding provided by diverse stakeholders (e.g., Transport Canada, Natural Environmental Research Council (U.K.) and Statoil ASA). Finally, I am interested in the role of scientists in environmental advocacy and activism work.

Career history:

Anna is a glaciologist working as a postdoctoral research fellow with the St Andrews Glaciology Group in the School of Geography and Sustainable Development at the University of St Andrews. Her current research utilizes 3D models to study the retreat processes of Antarctic glaciers that are vulnerable to rapid retreat due to climate change pushing them into regimes that are not seen in our observational recrod. This work is conducted as part of the DOMINOS project, which itself falls under the intensive research program of the International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration (thwaitesglacier.org). While Anna’s current research is modelling based, her previous research on massive icebergs, or ‘ice islands’, was primarily field based. She conducted ten field campaigns to the Canadian Arctic while pursuing her MSc and PhD degrees at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. Anna also has experience with satellite-based datasets, and led the Canadian Ice Island Drift, Deterioration and Detection (CI2D3) Database project, which created an uniquely extensive data set of Greenlandic ice islands. Anna is also an active environmental advocate and has volunteered with Greenpeace in a number or roles. She started local Greenpeace groups in two Canadian cities. She now serves as Co-Chair of Greenpeace Canada’s Board of Directors. As Trustee, Anna represented Greenpeace Canada on the Council of Greenpeace International.

Active research projects:

DOMINOS (Disintegration of Marine Ice-sheets Using Novel Optimised Simulations): "DOMINOS will use computer models to examine calving and associated dynamic processes that could cause the retreat and collapse of Thwaites Glacier. This will reduce uncertainty in the rates of retreat of the Thwaites Glacier and its contribution to sea-level rise." – thwaitesglacier.org/projects/dominos

Recent publications:

Crawford, A.J., Mueller, D.R., Crocker, G., Mingo, L., Desjardins, L., Dumont, D., Babin, M. 2020. Ice island thinning: Rates and model calibration with in situ observations from Baffin Bay, Nunavut. The Cryosphere. Accepted.

Mingo, L., Flowers, G., Crawford, A.J., Mueller, D., and Bigelow, D.G.: A stationary impulse-radar system for autonomous deployment in cold and temperature environments. Annals Glaciol. 1-9. 10.1017/aog.2020.2, 2020.

Crawford, A.J., Mueller, D.R., Crocker, G., Myers, P. 2018. The Aftermath of Petermann Glacier calving events (2008-2012): Ice island size distributions and meltwater dispersal. Journal of Geophysical Research, Oceans. 23:8812-8827. doi:10.1029/2018JC014388.

Crawford, A.J., Mueller, D.R., Joyal, G. 2018. Surveying drifting icebergs and ice islands: Detection and Mass Estimation with Aerial Photogrammetry and Laser Scanning. Remote Sensing. 10(575). doi: 10.3390/rs10040575.

Crawford, A.J., Crocker, G., Mueller, D., Desjardins, L., Saper, R., Carrieres, T. 2018. The Canadian Ice Island Drift, Deterioration and Detection (CI2D3) Database. Journal of Glaciology. 64(245): 1-5. doi: 10.1017/jog.2018.36.