Research interests:

My research is focused on understanding spatial and temporal variability in the Earth’s top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation balance, and interpreting this in relation to atmospheric variables, surface characteristics and the surface budget. I then extend this to test whether climate models are able to simulate these relationships and variability seen in the observations. I am particularly interested in the region of west Africa.

Career history:

I completed my integrated Bachelors/Masters in Physics in 2015, at the University of Edinburgh, gaining an Master of Physics with Honours (First Class). This included a year on ERASMUS exchange at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. Since 2015 I have been a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh.

Active research projects:

Interpreting Earth’s top-of-the-atmosphere broadband radiation fluxes using numerical models

My PhD research is focused on the radiation balance at the top-of-the-atmosphere and the surface over west Africa, interpreting this with respect to atmospheric variables, and comparing this to a climate model output.

Recent publications:

Mackie, A., Palmer, P. I., and Brindley, H.: Characterising energy budget variability at a Sahelian site: a test of NWP model behaviour, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-560, in review, 2017.

Mackie, A. R., P. I. Palmer, J. M. Barlow, D. P. Finch, P. Novelli, and L. Jaeglé (2016), Reduced Arctic air pollution due to decreasing European and North American emissions, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 121, 8692–8700, doi:10.1002/2016JD024923